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Massage

Massage therapy can help to decrease pain and muscle aches, reduce stress and anxiety, and promote overall wellness and relaxation.

What is a treatment that you might perform on a client with tight shoulders and lower back pain?

Brian Skow (Scottsdale, AZ) on Sep 29, 2012
1 user found this answer helpful
Tight shoulders and lower back pain and indicative of imbalance, due to stress and fatigue. Anma and Shiatsu will restore balance, by nourishing the weak and dispersing the strong, returning you to a peaceful, flowing, energized and healthy state of being. Lifestyle changes will help maintain the balance.
Mark Lohmann (Fort Lauderdale, FL) on Sep 29, 2012
1 user found this answer helpful
Many forms of massage, bodywork and energy work could be effective. It depends greatly on your body and condition. A good therapist with experience in medical massage should know a few different techniques that might help. I would typically treat with a combination of deep tissue massage, myofacial work and Active Isolated Stretching (AIS), to achieve the fastest and longest lasting results. Sometimes, the answer is a little more complicated in that my deep tissue massage, or my shiatsu, will be different from 10 other therapists in our office or elsewhere. Always remember, YOU are doing the healing, your therapist is only helping you along. This is VERY important. If you go in with that attitude, you are likely to get better. Be careful not to go once or twice and say "This isn't working". It might be that you are so tight, you need 8-10 visits or more in a short period of time to get results, or that you will get the fastest results working with a few different therapists at the same time. That being said, if I had to pick one, and one only, I'd choose AIS for myself. Personally, I have a number of people working on my trouble spots.
William Dinger (Los Angeles, CA) on Oct 1, 2012
1 user found this answer helpful
I would recommend a deep tissue massage using trigger point therapy which will pinpoint the areas most effected. After the deep tissue work finishing with relaxing swedish massage strokes. Some other ideas after the massage would be hot/cold therapy and some light stretches to open the area further. Depending on the situation follow up visits could be helpful.
Paula Reeder (Katy, TX) on Sep 29, 2012
First of all, you must have a therapist who will assess your pedal support as well as your leg length. Advanced massage techniques such as myofascial, and active release for the neck, upper body and gluteals would most likely help to affect the problem. However, if the problem is a pedal support issue, this should be addressed first
Krissy Viccione (East Greenwich, RI) on Sep 29, 2012
I would use Myofascial Release and deep tissue. MFR stretches the fascia that holds muscles in contracture and the deep tissue treats the muscles themselves. VERY effective treatment!
Molly Sutton (Denver, CO) on Sep 29, 2012
Hello! Tight shoulders and low back pain are very common for today's professional who works at a desk/computer for most days. Deep tissue work along with common swedish strokes for warming will be very effective in helping both areas. Working the hamstring (back side of the thighs) is important to relax the low back as this is where the muscles grow tight. My name is Molly Sutton and I work using Deep tissue as you would need. Please look up my profile and maybe we can work together!
K.C. Schellhammer (, ) on Sep 29, 2012
for the tight shoulders I would work on the pecs, often not worked by most therapist, however most types of jobs use the pecs a lot. Tightening of the pecs causes the Rhomboids in the back to become longer and weaker causing pain in the upper back shoulder area. For the lower back work the glutes, because the glutes stabilize the pelvis they often cause lower back pain.
Melissa McMaster (Overland Park, KS) on Sep 29, 2012
I use a combination of massages that include: myofascial (to help unlock the fascia, which can bunch up like Saran Wrap), trigger point (which can get rid of knots) and Swedish (which is very relaxing and helps "move things along). Hope this helps.
Faith Foster (Virginia Beach, VA) on Sep 29, 2012
The back, specifically the shoulders and shoulder blades, is one of my favorite areas to work on. I use various methods including acupressure, MFT, Assisted stretching, traction, joint mobilization alongside a base of Deep tissue work. My work is methodical and deliberate, achieving increased range of motion and decrease of tension. I have found that in terms of the shoulders and upper back, it is also important to address the chest and pectoral area, as the back affects the front. In terms of the lower back, I also work the hips and the obliques, as well as various assisted stretches that target the area as a whole.
Nancy Web (Pawtucket, RI) on Sep 28, 2012
There are many modalities that would treat this issue. I would suggest researching different techniques and see what resonates with you. If you prefer a treatment with clothes on consider shiatsu, thai massage or rossiter. Trigger point work, basic massage and deep tissue massage are also good choices. If the condition is due to deep structural issues I would recommend rolfing.
Julie LaFrano (Breckenridge, CO) on Sep 28, 2012
I do Ashiatsu and that works wonders for both. Well pretty much overall body. Look up an AOBT therapist in your area at deep feet.com and look for 'find a graduate'
Mary McKennan (Caldwell, ID) on Sep 29, 2012
30 min treatment...I would use a side lying position to target in on the areas in a very effective manner with a variety of massage moralities. 30 min chair massage could target those areas as well. 60 min or better yet 90 min would allow slower and more detailed, specific work.
Surjani Tarjoto (Beaverton, OR) on Sep 29, 2012
Using Deep Tissue and Trigger Point Massage and Muscle Energy Technique - what it does is used to relieve pain, fix joint problems, and increase range of motion.
Gary Watson (Glendale, AZ) on Sep 29, 2012
Would start out by warming muscles up with some light to medium pressure massage. Maybe use heat, check range of motion and perform Trigger Point therapy if we found issues. Stretch and massage the shoulder, including rotator cuff muscles and the neck thru all plains of motion. With low back pain it could be number of different areas that cause pain. I would check with client first and find out exactly where there low back hurts, how it happen, how long have they delt with this pain. Also check muscles that could be causing pain, example: low back, tight hamstrings, psoas muscle, glutes etc... Could possibly use ice or some type of cold treatment along with stretching. Massage pressure depends on how painful low back is
Anne Olivier (Dallas, TX) on Sep 29, 2012
Neuromuscular massage would be great for you. It's a very specific technique to release tension in the muscles. It's deep work but done without pain.
Nadine Fulle (Depew, NY) on Sep 29, 2012
What I normally do for a client before we even start is of course get your history and do a first assessment. After a assessment, the next appointment that I have with you I will give some moist heat on your entire back just so that the muscles can relax a bit more. I will start at your legs because some back pain will happen if hamstrings are tight. Our muscles coincide with each other at one point or another. If you hamstrings are tight, they pull somewhere in the glutes, if your glutes are tight then it goes to your lower back and etc.... after about 10 minutes of heat I will remove it and then start with swedish massage. I will continue thru your whole back in which to see where your tightness is. If your lower back is tight I will stretch your QL's and work along your lower spine just to see how tight you are. As for your shoulders, I will work on your upper back and neck to see if there are any trigger points or tightness especially around your scapulas. Many clients have tight rhomboids in which the scapulas will be tight against their back. I try to get under them to release the tightness. I look at the rest of your muscles and if need be I will do a bit of deep work but only if it is needed. After your massage I will suggest some neck and shoulder stretches and massage at least every other week so that the looseness goes away. It all depends on how bad the tightness is because honestly a few sessions would be in order to get the full benefit. Please remember that this is what I would do but every therapist is different in their assessment. If you have had a back injury or any health history, it is always a good idea to make sure that you get the okay to receive a massage.
Fabian Soto (Hollywood, FL) on Sep 29, 2012
is abouth 20 to 35 diferents points around shoulders scapula,trapezius.lats,quadratus lumburos,iliac crest ,front tides, lower abdomen hope You get thew picture
Bharat Kalra (Wheaton, IL) on Sep 29, 2012
Massage, Cranisacral Therapy, Cold Lasers for both conditions. Also I will give exercises to be performed by the person at home for faster healing.
Sandy Rabolli (Coral Springs, FL) on Sep 29, 2012
myo skeletal technique works well. Gewtting the gluts to fire up and down the spine , realigning the pelvis through stretching, and strian- counter strain and side lying positions to open the cervical and lower the shoulders and un stick the rhomboids. Log on to Erik Dalton myoskeletal massage and check out some of hos videos. I am certified with him and study daily with him on the inter net with FANTASATIC results
Sue-Brown Henry (Georgetown, DE) on Sep 29, 2012
Clients of Body, Mind and Soul receive a personalized massage consisting of any or all the modalities I perform. Integrative Muscular Movement Therapy and Soft Tissue Release mixed with CranioSacral Therapy, Acupressure and Myofascia Release is the best way to release the shoulders. Low back pain is successfully treated with a combination of craniosacral therapy, myofascial release, sports and swedish massage. Clients are also encouraged to stretch at home to continue lengthening the muscles.
Howard Rontal (Potomac, MD) on Sep 30, 2012
I have had a lot of experience working with frozen shoulders or lesser restrictions. I use a combination of Hellerwork (a gentler form of Rolfing) and myofascial release. I would use the same modalities to treat low back pain; hardly a week goes by when I don't treat someone for low back pain. Please see my website, HowardRontal.com, especially the testimonials from my clients, about my work on both these problems.
Mario Messina-Azekri (Portland, OR) on Sep 30, 2012
Two types of techniques, One, deep tissue massage with active release techniques and mobilization. Two. Bowenwork has techniques b=for both shoulder and back pain. Both of these two can be complemented with relaxation techniques and back and shoulder exercises.
Flo Lawrence (Woodland Hills, CA) on Sep 30, 2012
Very tight shoulders and neck responds very well to both acupuncture and deep tissue massage therapy, as well as to back pain. In fact, acupuncture is the most effective protocol for low back pain of all the healing modalities.
Jeff Shuman (East Hartford, CT) on Sep 29, 2012
There are many different treatments possible based on the limited information provided. However, I might use a mixture of Swedish and deep tissue massage or might go with some cupping therapy.
Ken Gorzen (New York, NY) on Sep 29, 2012
I like to find out WHY first...Is this a chronic condition? Does the pain have a starting origin (an injury, accident, ??). Do you work at a desk all day that is not ergonomically set-up? Or do you do construction work. In General: Deep tissue massage done with the assist of essential oils that penetrate into the muscles and soften the congested areas works great. Then ending with some craniosacral therapy.
Craig Bowlen (Panama City, FL) on Sep 29, 2012
i am experienced in shoulders and lower back pain contace me at craigbowlen09@gmail.com or my cell is 850 774 7813
Judy Christen (Sacramento, CA) on Sep 29, 2012
I would assess the situation after seeing and touching the back. Massage would be helpful and other modalities. I know several modalities having worked in the field for over 20 years.
Gary Semoes (Inwood, IA) on Sep 29, 2012
I would first check their IT bands on the sides of the upper legs. I have found that when those get tight it pulls on the gluts and the sacrum and goes in some cases all the way up to the base of the skull.
Roy Kenji Omori (Newport, RI) on Sep 29, 2012
After talking to and assessing the clients posture during most of the day and the type of work that they do, I would try to pinpoint the specific areas that are troublesome. Then I would would warm up the areas with some light compression and probably do deep tissue work to the shoulders and gluteal muscles,with feedback from the client
Therese Kortas (Woodridge, IL) on Sep 29, 2012
I would use deep tissue and probably Trigger point therapy as well.
Liz Yerkes (Longboat Key, FL) on Sep 28, 2012
Trigger point therapy/deep tissue usually works well. Myofascial release also. In addition, I would check out leg length and possible shortening of one, or both psoas muscles. Skin rolling should be helpful.
Gil Rutherford (Novato, CA) on Sep 28, 2012
Client will benefit from light to deep massage from neck down both sides of spinal muscles to lumbar, gluteus and hip area muscle relaxation.
Stacy Williams (Jacksonville, FL) on Sep 28, 2012
Some research says myofascial release is the treatment of your body's restrictions in your muscles and fascaie, or connective tissues, by applying gentle traction and pressures and positioning your joints in different angles to elicit a stretch. This technique, when combined with deep tissues, will improve your shoulders' range of motion. Massage therapy releases stiff tissues and muscles that can contribute to shoulder pain and injuries, while stretching alleviates tension and maintains your flexibility after your massage. Doing flexibility training before a massage helps your massage therapist move and perform the bodywork more effectively because your tissues are more elastic and less stiff. Deep tissue massage involves applying various degrees of pressure on the muscle tissues with slow, gradual strokes along the grain or lines of the muscles. The level of pressure applied would depend on the level of pain or stiffness that you have. During the massage, you might experience some crunches or bumps as the pressure is applied along your muscles. These are the break-up of the muscle and tissue adhesions that cause stiffness and pain. Seek a quality physician and massage therapist for treatment soon.
David Martin (Matthews, NC) on Sep 28, 2012
Myofascial release works incredibly well for low back pain. With tight shoulders I do detail work, using deep tissue and anything else I can think of to get the job done. Every client is different.
Julie Deramo (Bellevue, WA) on Sep 28, 2012
Tight shoulders and low back pain are two entirely different species. Tight shoulders can be caused by tight pec muscles, or by tight muscles under the shoulder blades. There are several muscles involved with the shoulders, so there is no one answer until you're on the massage table. The cause... basically, the "Activities of Daily Living", are clues to why you have tight shoulder muscles, but it is not the only clue. Palpation of both shoulder girdles can also find that one side is compensating for the other in ways that may not be initially obvious. Low back pain has a couple of components. If it is more in the middle, it could be from tight muscles located on the anterior side of the spine, known as the iliopsoas musculature, and may actually involve the entire hip; or, it could be more the sacral musculature having spasms or adhesions. If it is more on the sides, there may be spasms in the quadratus lumborum, the tissues along the hip crest, or even in the glutes. Adhesions in all of the above would definitely be likely, although a lot of relief can be found with initially treating the muscle spasms. With both ailments, the treatment that I perform includes Swedish, Deep Tissue, and several other modalities all combined, so it is difficult to single out just one. Once the condition of the tissue is assessed, the spasms are usually addressed first, and then the adhesions that are restricting movement and fluids. Julie Deramo Align Bodyworks
Demetri Travlos (New York, NY) on Sep 28, 2012
I would just perform a massage with specific focus in that area. After I had warmed up the tissues I would focus on each individual muscle with friction and stretching.
Jeff Hysong (Glendale, AZ) on Sep 28, 2012
Personally I provide trigger Point Therapy, which is good for any tight muscle you might have.. it is a more precise tool than just regular massage, it releases stress/trigger points by applying direct pressure on the point with your thumb or finger, this allows the muscle to relax... as I was told, you're actually giving the muscle permission to relax and release its tension... once its released, regualar swedish or sport techniques can be used to further relax the muscle and provide relief
Micah Mays (Norman, OK) on Sep 28, 2012
It all depends on the tightness of the tissues. You can add a variety of treatment options to help with those areas. For instance Myofascial Release, Swedish Massage, the use of heat to help loosen the tissues, all of these are a wonderful treatment plan for tightness and pain.
Sarah Murray (Wilmington, DE) on Sep 28, 2012
These two issues may or may not be related. But I would treat them as if they were, because there may be compensation happening from one area or the other. In the case of tight shoulders, I would observe the posture to see if there is any forward rotation, and then do a Pectoralis minor release, followed by extension of the arms to open up the shoulder area. Deep work in the trapezius muscles helps relieve tension as well. I always give exercises to do at home, as this will maintain the opening created during the massage. As for the lower back, I would definitely work on the gluteus muscles and their attachments, as well as quadratus lumborum and the lower erector spinae (lower back muscles). I would make sure that there was no inflammation, since massage could actually cause it to flare up. In that case, I would use very light pressure and essential oils to minimize inflammation. Hope this helps! Sarah
Jill Garner (Mahomet, IL) on Sep 28, 2012
I think the best treatment would be massage around the rhomboids and under the scapula with trigger point release on areas needed. It should also be remembered to massage opposing muscles. Lower back pain can be treated with slight stretching and warming of the muscles with massage around the coccygeal, sacrum and lumbar vertebrae.
Jerry Foster (Saint Louis, MO) on Sep 28, 2012
I'd start with Reiki and then combine Swedish massage and deep tissue work to help alleviate the tightness and pain in both your shoulders and lower back. A full body massage can do wonders for these conditions.
Kennette Klees (Houston, TX) on Sep 28, 2012
There are specialized massages for Neck, Shoulder and Upper Back.
Tracy Bloom (Fairfield, CT) on Sep 28, 2012
Heat followed by Swedish massage, deep work if it is comfortable for the client. I would also recommend a routine of Pilates exercises, designed to strengthen and stretch your muscles. In my opinion, exercise goes hand in hand with massage for wellness.
Katherine Turner (Schertz, TX) on Sep 28, 2012
starting out with a regular swedish massage with some stretching for the back would be good for you. if you have had a massage before and know the pressure of deep tissue that will help you as well. it sounds like you may have "knots"(toxins within the system) in your upper back and shoulder areas. that area may need a little trigger pointing too. now for those trigger pointing will be a little painful at first and afterward the session if you do the stretches i show you the pain should go away some if not completely. if they get to be more uncomfortable then a heatingpad will be the best to put on to keep the tension down. any other questions feel free to ask i'll be happy to help
Jade McDonald (Wyckoff, NJ) on Sep 28, 2012
Tight shoulders is the classic sign of stress. Sitting at a computer all day working out ,shoveling snow,or raking leaves playing golf. Warming up the area ,and working toward a deep tissue technique usually relieves the tightness.Lower back,I would do leg stretches,work the upper glutes,hips stretching the back.Remember, everything is a process and continuing to recieve massage on a regular basis is your best defense against tight muscles!
Herb Gleason (Pompano Beach, FL) on Sep 28, 2012
Slow deep tissue compressions,letting muscle melt working neck and shoulders as well as the QL
Nina Edley (Laurel, MD) on Sep 28, 2012
Deep Tissue/Sports massage would be highly recommended due to the specific & detail work you receive.
Danica Carlson (Berkeley, CA) on Sep 28, 2012
For someone with tight shoulders and lower back pain I would recommend a therapeutic and energetic treatment. By applying several different "deep tissue" modalities such as Trigger Point, Myotherapy and techniques such as muscle and tendon stripping with a combination of deep energetic work you address both the physical problem and it's cause. Most people who have these types of pains are working at a computer for several hours a day putting a lot of stress on their mind and body. To eliminate the effects of this stress we have to relax the body as well as work out the tension. Such a combination of techniques will leave you with a sense of deep relaxation and serenity while greatly reducing the tension in your body.
Pamela Fields (Warner Robins, GA) on Sep 28, 2012
I work the neck area I give the shoulder area deep tissue massage. I work the entire back the buttocks. Then I give a hot stone massage then I finish with a hot towel
Bette Eastman (Plant City, FL) on Sep 28, 2012
Probably the most common complaint! I would engage a Swedish relaxation massage beginning with the client lying on their stomach (prone) and placing a moist heating pad over the areas for a few moments while we take some deep breaths. Once the muscles are warm, I would begin with effleurage to continue the warming of muscle tissue and seek out any tender or trigger points with my hands. I would address the release of these through cross-friction or compression and use petrissage over the rest of the back returning to deeper long effleurage strokes. I would also compress the sacral area. In an hour massage I would spend approximately 30 minutes on the back. Additionally, with my client lying supine (on their back), I would work the upper chest, shoulders and back of the neck. Increasing water intake is very beneficial for these type of painful areas and reviewing what type of movements or lack of movements are causing the pain and altering them. Additionally, a once a week Swedish massage.
Geraldine Macinski (Sandy Hook, CT) on Sep 28, 2012
Moderately deep pressure Therapeutic massage for lower back pain is effective. Rotator cuff evaluation and treatment would be appropriate for shoulder discomfort.
Geraldine Macinski (Sandy Hook, CT) on Sep 28, 2012
Moderately deep pressure Therapeutic massage for lower back pain is effective. Rotator cuff evaluation and treatment would be appropriate for shoulder discomfort.
Marsha Copeland (Sonoma, CA) on Sep 28, 2012
I would suggest we work on their back, neck, shoulders and arms seated on a special massage chair. I am trained in Amma acupressure and it is the most effective treatment to address tight shoulders, low back and pain in the arms & hands. The session requires only 30 minutes. The client will feel the effects of better circulation, movement of stagnant energy and overall rejuvenation immediately.
Dacia Rollins (Haleiwa, HI) on Sep 28, 2012
A combination of trigger point therapy and assisted stretching works great.
Bette Eastman (Plant City, FL) on Sep 28, 2012
Probably the most common complaint! I would engage a Swedish relaxation massage beginning with the client lying on their stomach (prone) and placing a moist heating pad over the areas for a few moments while we take some deep breaths. Once the muscles are warm, I would begin with effleurage to continue the warming of muscle tissue and seek out any tender or trigger points with my hands. I would address the release of these through cross-friction or compression and use petrissage over the rest of the back returning to deeper long effleurage strokes. I would also compress the sacral area. In an hour massage I would spend approximately 30 minutes on the back. Additionally, with my client lying supine (on their back), I would work the upper chest, shoulders and back of the neck. Increasing water intake is very beneficial for these type of painful areas and reviewing what type of movements or lack of movements are causing the pain and altering them. Additionally, a once a week Swedish massage.
Carol Stuhmer (Miami, FL) on Sep 28, 2012
There are many different techniques among Massage Modalities. The focus is the same, the modalities vary. We all have our favorite and those are the ones we usually suggest. That said, CST, NMT, Trigger Point and Myofascial are among the methods that I use that would help. At both offices where I Practice, one at a Chiropractors office and one with a Doctor of Oriental Medicine, LLLT is available (low level laser therapy) which is very effective in releasing trigger points which may be involved in the pain you are experiencing. In most cases a history is very useful information in helping to reach a better understanding of what may be going on with you. After all, tight shoulder and back pain is not uncommon, but the causes vary greatly. contact me if I can be of assistance, Carol Stuhmer massagecas on gmail.
Tony Ruggiero (Greenville, SC) on Sep 28, 2012
It sounds like the client is "armoring" and this might be causing both problems. Armoring is basically subconscious splinting the muscles in the back. It can cause muscular spasming in both the lower back and shoulder. I would work to relax the entire back and lengthen the muscles reducing the stressors on these muscles. In addition to using Arnica infused oil to encourage the relaxation of muscles, stretching and Swedish Massage is I believe what is called for in this case.
Carol Hayes (West Dundee, IL) on Sep 28, 2012
I would massage the whole back and also the front of the body below the shoulders, but doing extra work on the backs of the shoulders, using deeper pressure as tolerated. Same for the lower back, I would spend more time there and do some deeper pressure strokes. Massage in this manner is very effective when performed regularly.
Hubert Holtzclaw (Dorchester Center, MA) on Sep 28, 2012
Hello, without knowing any particulars about your ailments I would suggest stretching and testing your range of motion then possibly applying a deep heat treatment with hot towels/heat ointment. Are your trapezious muscles tight ? As far as your lower back, is it from an injury ? Have you seen a chiropractor ? Stretching along with a deep heat treatment may work as well along with massage. I'm sure that I can assist you with your ailments. Please contact me to schedule a in home or studio appointment.
Fred Feldman (Jacksonville, FL) on Sep 28, 2012
Neuromuscular therapy properly applied is the best massage modality for these two areas.
David Ward (Abington, PA) on Sep 28, 2012
myofascial release or trigger point therapy followed by light to heavy stretching can help to relieve ,tight traps,and overstretched pectoral muscles resulting in relaxing the neck flexors and extensors so the client can breathe easier causing them to be more relAXED.
Peggy Richards (Scottsdale, AZ) on Sep 28, 2012
Massage techniques that involve site specific tension and reduction and Tragerâ„¢ or Rolfing also known as Structural Integration, which gets to an area through affecting another. The body has a web of tissue that surrounds the muscles, bones, nerve tissue, blood vessels and organs that is called fascia. It is like a web or a nylon stocking that can get snagged as a result of injury or emotional trauma. So the nylon may be pulling from your foot to your shoulder and your shoulder is showing the strain. Once that whole line is released, the shoulder may give way to relaxing and, allowing the bones to be in their sockets with more ease. With everything resting from your head down, like blocks - your shoulders on comfortably on top of your rib cage. This would more efficiently allow your back to do the muscular movements your shoulder and neck may be currently straining to do. And when compensation sets in, this is an example of what can happen when the real problem originates from some where else.
Nobledamon Withey-Bey (Atlanta, GA) on Sep 30, 2012
after a 20min heat application of both the shoulders and back i would massage with a rather firm pressure and have the client return for a deeper session until the muscles are reeducated to its natural relaxed state
Trina Elson (Stuart, FL) on Sep 30, 2012
When experiencing tight shoulders and/or lower back pain massage can help to relieve your pain. We use targeted massage/ trigger point therapies to loosen the muscles that are contracted and causing you the discomfort We also have ultrasound and muscle stimulating machine to aid us in getting you back to feeling at your best.
Robert Conroy (San Diego, CA) on Oct 17, 2012
Hot Stone/Deep Tissue
Shane Stout (Anaheim, CA) on Oct 15, 2012
The back is full of different muscles all affected by our limbs. The lower back is usually associated with legs whereas the upper back and neck are due to the arms and neck. I would explore the entire back among other areas to find the origin of the pain. The lower back can also be highly strained by use or over use of the abdomen region because the muscles are attached and if 1 side is looser or stuck in a consistent state of contraction you may hunch at the stomach area pulling on your lower back region.
Juan Del Risco (Washington Dc, DC) on Oct 18, 2012
Massage Massage therapy can help to decrease pain and muscle aches, reduce stress and anxiety, and promote overall wellness and relaxation. I would recommend a deep tissue massage using trigger point therapy which will pinpoint the areas most effected. After the deep tissue work finishing with relaxing swedish massage strokes. Some other ideas after the massage would be hot/cold therapy and some light stretches to open the area further. Depending on the situation follow up visits could be helpful.
Crystal Wright (Valrico, FL) on Oct 18, 2012
Depending on how tight your muscles are will determine the pressure of massage that must be given. I would reccommend 1x/wk. weekly massage for a month at first and as you loosen up you may choose to take down the frequency of massage or have lighter pressure massages in between deep sessions at times. I would reccommend a full body massage with focus on the upper body and lots of stretching for the hips, hams, neck, and rhomboid/trapezius muscles. Sincerely, Crystal Wright, LMT Valrico, FL 888-609-5538
Jasmin Pitter (Uniondale, NY) on Nov 9, 2012
Thermotherapy treatment that maybe beneficial - reducing hypertonicity in the muscles in the shoulder gridle, lengthen and mobilize tissues (gliding stripping, static compression), treat trigger points, myofascial release work, and stretching. Lower back pain - several things may attributed to this ie. sprain, strain, or just non-specific. Depending on the cause - address postural distortion, treat trigger points, deep longitudinal stripping. Postural reeducation and proper body mechanics are important. Stop offending activities. Be mindful of the type of shoes worn on a regular basis especially shoes with very high heels.
James Kennedy (, ) on Oct 20, 2012
That is my expertise. I use Swedish, Deep Tissue, light touch, I realign the body and all pain goes away. James
Joseph McCoy (Muenster, TX) on Oct 15, 2012
I would do advanced orthopedic and myoskeletal techniques and also incorporating myofascial and trigger point work if necessary. Also muscle energy techiniques to loosen tight and facilitated muscles, while recommending a strenthening program at home for the weak and inhibited muscles.
Paul Simmons (Lotus, CA) on Oct 15, 2012
Most general massage practitioners can help with this. Even chair massage can have beneficial effect for this. Depending on your orthopedica stability and lifestyle, I would try general massage, or a practicitioner who specialisez in sports massage or muscle balancing. REGULAR monthly bodywork would be a good thing, at least for awhile.
Dawn Lamonica (Hyde Park, MA) on Oct 10, 2012
Presuming the tight shoulders and lower back pain derive from everyday living and not an injury, I usually treat with a combination of neuromuscular therapy and Swedish/deep tissue.
Ashley Oliva (Winter Garden, FL) on Oct 9, 2012
Well People with tight shoulders and low back pain is a common problem that can be worked out with a variety of swedish strokes, which are light to medium strokes that help increase the circulation to aid in flushing out toxins that might be floating in the fascia and causing knots to form as well as relaxing tightening of the muscles that could be due to stress or repetative movements such as rounded shoulders at a work desk for several hours . Then I would possibly do some deeper work along the trapz and other muscles that could be pulling on the shoulders. The low back could use some heat to help relax the muscles if there wasn't a recent injury and some myofascial release to help break up adhesions in that area. The treatments are all varied and you could always mix up the techniques depending on the clients pain tolerance and after a detailed intake with the client it will help better to then decide what treatment needs to be done, but a massage is definitely needed for someone suffering from tight shoulders and low back pain!
Dmitriy Greenberg (Louisville, KY) on Oct 12, 2012
Welcome, I will help eliminate your problems instantly!
Karen Orlosky (Lafayette, CO) on Oct 14, 2012
I would begin with an assesment of the entire body to determine source of the issues. I would certainly put my attention on the cervical and lumbar areas along with both front and back sides of the shoulder area. I use a combination of massage, CranioSacral therapy and Reiki to detect and release restrictions in any area of the body. In truth, each treatment begins in a similar manner, however it soon becomes unique to the individual receiving the treatment!
Kelly Call (Springville, UT) on Oct 14, 2012
I have helped many people with tight shoulders and lower back pain. Understand that it's not going to be just a matter of my 'technique' and 'treatment'. Tight shoulders and lower back pain is a composite condition of posture, work load, and related emotional tensions and how you carry yourself. The key is resolving the emotional tension and returning to peace. You must understand that with all emotional release work, there is an emotional resolution process that involves your learning how to do an emotional skills that has not yet been mastered. Then the tight shoulders and lower back pain will heal and the soreness will pass but not when it is continually being irritated by the underlying emotional tension. I work with people to help them resolve the tension and release the pressure. Releasing the muscle tension then becomes easy once you are not so prone to the underlying triggering emotional state. Then the soreness will cycle thru it's healing process unaggravated, the physical problems can be assisted by massage and the tissue can heal. Understand that a physical problem like this exists as an outcome of underlying conditions that I have described. Healing it involves addressing each level underlying and also the top level which is the physical tissue itself. Don't just think of physical problems as one dimensional but multidimensional including the levels of physical, emotional and thought, work and behavior habits that create the emotional. You do have some choice at each level and you can learn to have more power of choice at each level and to master skills of thought, emotion and the result is that the physical level will be nurtured where it was overstressed in particular areas like the tight shoulders and lower back pain. You bring me any particular focused pain like this and I can walk you thru and give you the understanding of each of these levels and suggestions for resolving and improving the health of the area. Craniosacral is one part of the eclectic application of techniques I use to do this. I also use other advanced bodywork techniques to facilitate adjusting muscle tightness. Because this situation involves both the pelvic girdle and the shoulder girdle it may be necessary to go all the way into the muscles of the legs because they influence the pelvis and correct the imbalance of muscle tensions that effect your posture like adjusting the setting of a sail by means of tightening or slackening the muscle tensions from front to back from the legs upward. Posture correction from the ground up if necessary including the relevant emotional issues that pull on the muscular system will resolve it as you learn the skills and we get the tensions adjusted so your skeletal posture is optimal and you aren't carrying emotional baggage that pulls you off center which it literally does thru the means of your muscles. On the physical level we would also need to look at possible weight issues. All these factors influence your posture and posture balance related issues. The pelvic and shoulder girdles are pivotal areas for balance and posture and are therefore connected in terms of one area impacts the other as we walk upright and depend on both to be fluid and adaptable to maintain good posture and balance. The answer to this question is therefore more that the treatment depends on what conditions need to be resolved based on an evaluation of all these relevant aspects.
Nic Scogna (Skippack, PA) on Oct 14, 2012
Without any further information or insight as to what is causing the tight shoulders and low back pain I would palpate the area first to find out which muscles are affected at the shoulders and question the client about posture, work, and any activities or recent accidents that may have caused the symptoms. As a general rule I like to perform some AIS and TrP work to loosen up and alleviate muscle tightness around the joints and Trigger points in the muscle fibers.
Candace Wells (Baton Rouge, LA) on Oct 22, 2012
Most of the clients that I treat have or have had tight shoulders or lower back pain to some degree. To be honest so have I. That is probably why I am an expert in this area. I typically use a combination of deep tissue massage, trigger point therapy, and connective tissue massage in order to have the greatest effect on the muscles. Before starting the massage portion of the treatment however, I find it very helpful to apply heat to the tight muscles. This heat will penetrate the muscles and soften them allowing them to be more pliable and relaxed when the massage begins. Since you are experiencing these problems, Deep Tissue or Trigger Point Therapy may be a little uncomfortable. Make sure that you remain in constant communication with your therapist and let him or her know if you are in any pain. The goal is not to hurt you but rather to help you. Please remember that one massage is not enough to create lasting changes. Massage Therapy should be considered a way of life. Many of my clients have had amazing success when it comes to tight shoulders and lower back pain because of the consistent action with massage therapy. Depending on your insurance coverage and your State, you may be able to get massage covered for you. It's worth looking into. To hold you over between massages it is very important to be proactive with self care. Make sure you drink a lot of water. I normally tell my clients to drink half their body weight in ounces. Example: If you weigh 120 pounds, you should drink 60 ounces per day. Taking hot baths and showers have always been good for tight muscles.Try to have proper body posture. It may also help to stretch in the morning and at night. Massage Therapy is good for many things. Give it a try and see what it can do for you. I hope I answered your question. Candace Wells, LMT
Karen Bronson (Bothell, WA) on Oct 24, 2012
Cupping massage therapy does wonders for joints and muscle tightness. Be sure to see a therapist that is certified in cupping. Cupping styles and techniques can vary greatly among therapists. I would probably use the magnet cups(similar to acupuncture) for your shoulder and depending on your back symptoms use the regular cups for deep relaxation of tight muscles.
Lena Crane (, ) on Nov 6, 2012
For tight shoulders, I would perform deep tissue massage and work on any knots around the scapula and upper traps. For low back pain, I would ask the client a couple questions to determine the most probable cause of pain. Then I would use a combination of swedish, deep tissue, and stretching on the muscle groups causing low back pain.
Carin Piacente (Putnam Valley, NY) on Nov 4, 2012
Well first I would try and find the reason for this tightness or overuse in these areas of concerns. Most postural problems create this "tightness" we find in our upper back and shoulder region. As far as the lower back is concerned, this can be caused by lack of core muscle strength. Stretching the pec muscles as well has the hamstrings which are both opposing muscles groups to the areas of concerns also helps. Dr. P
Tonya Ben Mansour (Mobile, AL) on Nov 23, 2012
I would begin by warming up the tissue possibly with hot stones and then perform a series of tui na, or A.R.T./P, fused with NMT
Daniel Candelaria (El Paso, TX) on Dec 5, 2012
Before we are able to come up with a treatment, there are other factors to look at. 1. Why are your shoulders tight? -from working out -lifting/moving things around the house etc. 2. Then we would have to do an assessments and find out your range of motion. -which muscles are keeping your are from moving in full ROM. After answering these questions then we could put together a treatment plan. For the lower back: Again we ask the question, why is there pain? - from working out - from doing things around the house. What muscles are causing the pain? If its from tight muscles then we can treat. Treatment: -warm up muscles of back, lower and upper. -do deep tissue work on QL -work loosen up muscles of the glutes -work on the psoas muscles Hope this helps
Keisha Jones (Chicago, IL) on Dec 19, 2012
I'd first conduct a very thorough intake, upon gaining all of the information that's needed, (e.g., watching the client's gait, learning about their frequent activities and their work, to the amount of typing and television watching takes place on a weekly basis, etc.). I'd probably start my client off prone, I would then properly assess all of the rotator cuff muscles along with the rest of the shoulder girdle muscles. I'd also palpate the back in it's entirety, along with the gluts, hamstrings, gastroc/soleus, calcaneous, and the plantar portion of the feet. I'd then turn my client to their side and then begin to warm up the tissue and muscles of the shoulder and surrounding areas. Once warmed, I'd perform a plethora of modalities to the shoulder girdle as well as the neck/head to release the shoulders. I'd also work on the Lats, Intercostals, and the entire arm region. Repeat on other side. I'd follow-through until I reached the lower region of the back and I'd work emphatically on the QL (major low back pain culprit), Piriformis (major low back pain culprit), Glut Medius, Maximus, and Minimus. I'd scrub the "traffic jam" affectionately known as the Greater Trochanter. The IT bands will be paid a visit along with the Hamstrings and Gastrocs. Repeat on other side. I'd also effectively provide a serious amount of stretching. To effectively create balance, the same amount of release must be provided to the anterior portion of the body. Therefore, the Pectorals would be released, along with the Iliopsoas (major issue in low back pain). I'd wrap up with connecting the entire body, and finish off with a soothing and much needed head, neck and shoulder massage. I'd close our space, and send you back into the universe more loving and encouraging you to pay the new relief and peace you've gained from our session, forward to another human being. <3 --Namaste
Richard Bartlett (Lansing, MI) on Dec 11, 2012
Many forms of massage should work well for you. I suggest a firm Swedish massage, or deep tissue work that is gentle enough to not cause more pain.
Zhanna Izotova (Beverly Hills, CA) on Nov 1, 2012
A client with tight shoulders and lower back pain will get benefited from Deep Tissue and MFT. It is always great to do point work (after warm up) on QL muscles and Hip muscles to ease lower back pain. MFT is very helpful and you can see the results right away. Tight shoulder might need some PNF stretches and definitely Deep Tissue!
John Romano (Oakland Park, FL) on Nov 1, 2012
MPS therapy of course. It follows the same protocols as acupuncture but does not use needles. It is safe to have done and has an extremely high success rate
Jason Sands (Sarasota, FL) on Oct 25, 2012
Tight shoulders and low back pain are commonly paired together. The majority of people that I treat with these two complaints are computer operators either professionally or recreationally or both. The majority of their day is spent sitting with a head-forward and shoulders rounded-forward posture. This allows the muscle tissue of the front of the neck, the chest and the front of the hips to grow short and decreases normal range-of-motion. Consequently, the hips tip forward resulting in Lordosis which leads to low back pain and eventually could lead to disc-compression disorders. Simultaneously, the head forward posture strains the muscles growing down from the back of the skull to the upper thoracic vertebrae and the shoulders-forward posture strains the muscles from the shoulder blades to the mid-thoracic spine resulting in the "screwdriver in the back" feeling. If left untreated, it can cause disk compression disorders around the nerves of the brachial plexus resulting in Carpal Tunnel-like symptoms. Deep tissue of the neck and back seems like the appropriate choice. However, with a balance-minded approach I'll open up the chest, neck and hips. The goal is to reeducate the body to a new normal anterior-posterior balance thus eliminating the pain of the neck and lower back.
Dionna John (Atlanta, GA) on Oct 24, 2012
You should schedule a deep tissue and sports (and or thai) massage.
Luis Rivera (Marietta, IL) on Oct 27, 2012
A good light force, detailed massage focusing on the issues and unwinding of the muscles would be best. There are many therapies in massage that would help. I use Acupressure and Structural Integration Methods to help my clients reach their best results. Thank you.
Helen Delger (Fridley, MN) on Oct 27, 2012
I feel very qualified to answer this question as this seems to be the main complaint of the majority of the clients I work on. I specialize in Trigger Point work and have had great success in releasing tightness, stiffness & pain in these areas using trigger point then following up the release with long effleurage strikes to smooth out & stretch the muscle. It's very important to follow up the release of the trigger point or the trigger point just reforms in the area of the muscle that was just released. You will also want to work the neck muscles, paying particular attention to the splendid capitis and levator as this go down to the shoulder blade. Obviously the traps and rhomboids will need to be worked out but don't ignore the longisimus as that frequently gets numerous trigger points and will keep the back tight. Work your way down to the QL muscles and work close to the vertebrea from using your supported thumbs or first knuckle of your index finger from the vertebrea out. Then work along the iliac crest. Then do trigger point work to the 3 major glute muscles. Also, for low back, it's likely that you may need to work the psoas muscles as well as do some passive stretching to the hamstrings.
Saderia Cheatham (Mechanicsville, VA) on Oct 29, 2012
First I would friction the shoulders and lower back to loosen up the muscles,then I would effleurage and petrissage the areas.
Stephen Fortier (Pinellas And Pasco Countie, FL) on Oct 27, 2012
There are neuromuscular protocals for both of these syndromes. I have had excellent results working with these issues.
Michael Wolfes (Palm Desert, CA) on Oct 7, 2012
Therapeutic massage.
Breanna Gieseker (Santa Rosa, CA) on Oct 7, 2012
There are some questions that would need to be answered before I could say for sure, for example....has there been a diagnosis of some kind? Perhaps there was an injury or trauma or maybe it is just chronic over/underuse or poor postural habits. It would also be important to know if there were structural issue like scoliosis or lordosis present before a truly effective treatment plan could be put into place. If the pain and tension is chronic and there are no other health factors coming into play I would say a good place to start would be with a focused session of Myofascial therapy to address the specific muscles that are in crisis. I would also suggest that this be accompanied by PNF or tense and release stretches to help reducate the muscles in the above mentioned areas. Lastely I would reccomend Manual Lymphatic Drainage to reduce and inflammation in the area and aid in pain reduction.
Mary Jo Smiley (Warrendale, PA) on Oct 1, 2012
I am a nationally certified myofascial trigger point therapist. I would treat the trigger points that have referred pain in those areas and show you how to treat yourself and change some things that you are doing the perpetuate the problems. I would concentrate on those areas for the entire session if you wanted.
Bonnie Holzman (Miami, FL) on Sep 30, 2012
Start out with Hot packs followed with Massage
Canney Yang (New Hyde Park, NY) on Oct 1, 2012
Trigger point + MFR first then plus few drops of muscle&joint oil to make the pain area warm and relief. Swedish strokes and ROM are the following steps then show home stretches.
Tony Adomaitis (Leominster, MA) on Oct 1, 2012
First I will assess your posture and work style and ask you if you have been diagnosed with any disc problems? The shoulders and back share the pressure load from a shortened anterior torso. Myofascial work is performed on all four sides of your body to re-balance the tensions around your spine. Then you and I work to free your breathing and your abdomen. The areas to be treated in subsequent sessions are your feet, legs and jaw. The use of electronic devices have put most of us in a perpetual forward bending posture. However, this can be changed with postural re-education. Please understand, this is a quick paragraph that cannot relay the depth of the actual treatment experience.
John Musco (Ithaca, NY) on Oct 1, 2012
Start with light pressure with Efflueurage technique to warm the muscles and get the blood flowing. Then go into deep tissue massage and trigger point therapy isolating tight areas. Certain stretches are integrated throughout the session. End with some hot stone therapy where the stone is used on areas that need additional work.
Dianna Kendrick (Martinez, GA) on Oct 1, 2012
My first approach is to open the hypertonic(tight) pectoral muscles. The neck and shoulders ache due to the overload placed on our back and neck muscles through poor posture, forward head posture and our daily lives and jobs. Pain is our bodies only method of communication. We need to stretch the large,stronger muscles on the front of our bodies, i.e. pecs,quads and strengthen the over stretched,overloaded back muscles, i.e trapezius, rhomboids, 3 posterior rotator cuff muscles and occipitals. Hope this helps. Dianna
Kim Greenlee (El Paso, TX) on Sep 30, 2012
I would most likely use neuromuscular, myofascial and swedish massage therapy after evaluating tissues and structure along with lifestyle questions to get a better understanding of the causes(s) of the tight shoulders and low back pain.
Kim Greenlee (El Paso, TX) on Sep 30, 2012
I would most likely use neuromuscular, myofascial and swedish massage therapy after evaluating tissues and structure along with lifestyle questions to get a better understanding of the causes(s) of the tight shoulders and low back pain.
Alicia Bunting (Phoenix, AZ) on Sep 30, 2012
It very common to have both areas tender. I treat the body as a whole so I would do stretches for shoulders along with acupressure, stretches for hips to loosen gluts that contribute to lower back tenderness & pain. Pec muscles should always be done when working rhomboids(muscles along scapula). So I would focus on upper body which includes gluteal muscles
Brittany Mitchell (Springfield, IL) on Dec 29, 2012
Many forms of alternative treatment would be helpful and even a combination. Some work on pecs to open up the front can help with any inbalance, deep tissue and swedish to help brake up any fascial adhesions, some light stretching, and then flush or rehydrate those areas which were so tight to aide in healing. It greatly depends on your body, and how you feel or what modalities you prefer. Good luck!
Joseph Weger (Ft Mitchell, KY) on Sep 30, 2012
Dear Zeel Member, For whatever this information is worth to you, ALL therapists are definitely NOT created equal. I know this from having preformed and received MANY (terrible) massages for about 20 years. I could count on 1 hand how many excellent massage therapists have worked on me. Also I was also rated the #1 therapuetic based deep tissue worker in NYC for 6 consecutive years, The #1 Aromatherapist, 1 of the top ten alternative healers, and one of the top prenatal therapist with 20 years in the private practice sector. on my own over the years, as often the techniques in school were inadequate at best, or non effective at Tight shoulders and lower back pain are two of my serious specialties. I have had many people go to other therapist for years, FINALLY find me, and 9 of 10 times they are “fixed” in a few short sessions, OR, their pain scale numbers go WAY down, and now have a good quality of life that they missed out in years. I have developed a lot of techniques all. Having had so much press behind me, had brought me a huge share of clients who spent tons of money and saw many practitioners with no/little relief. I use a lot of techniques. In particular it is vital to warm up the site to prepare the muscle bringing blood flow in, and engorging the muscle with blood which prepares it for deeper work. I then, use friction work and work slowly and gradually (working with your pain thresholds – constant communication between us) with ever increasing pressure as you build up the tolerance during the session. Then I use a little known technique called the Teyf Method which is putting the muscle on the maximum “passive stretch”, and then stripping and stretching the muscle and lastly digging in with a trigger point technique which causes the muscles to release. . I would be more then happy to speak more to you about it in person. Kindest regards, Joseph Weger, Union, KY 646-372-2226
Joseph Weger (Ft Mitchell, KY) on Sep 30, 2012
Dear Zeel Member, For whatever this information is worth to you, ALL therapists are definitely NOT created equal. I know this from having preformed and received MANY (terrible) massages for about 20 years. I could count on 1 hand how many excellent massage therapists have worked on me. Also I was also rated the #1 therapuetic based deep tissue worker in NYC for 6 consecutive years, The #1 Aromatherapist, 1 of the top ten alternative healers, and one of the top prenatal therapist with 20 years in the private practice sector. on my own over the years, as often the techniques in school were inadequate at best, or non effective at Tight shoulders and lower back pain are two of my serious specialties. I have had many people go to other therapist for years, FINALLY find me, and 9 of 10 times they are “fixed” in a few short sessions, OR, their pain scale numbers go WAY down, and now have a good quality of life that they missed out in years. I have developed a lot of techniques all. Having had so much press behind me, had brought me a huge share of clients who spent tons of money and saw many practitioners with no/little relief. I use a lot of techniques. In particular it is vital to warm up the site to prepare the muscle bringing blood flow in, and engorging the muscle with blood which prepares it for deeper work. I then, use friction work and work slowly and gradually (working with your pain thresholds – constant communication between us) with ever increasing pressure as you build up the tolerance during the session. Then I use a little known technique called the Teyf Method which is putting the muscle on the maximum “passive stretch”, and then stripping and stretching the muscle and lastly digging in with a trigger point technique which causes the muscles to release. . I would be more then happy to speak more to you about it in person. Kindest regards, Joseph Weger, Union, KY 646-372-2226
Andy Ly (Sterling Heights, MI) on Sep 30, 2012
First, with Hot stone therapeutic massage, second cupping, last acupuncture then you can have a real relief after one visit session.
Martin Schweizer (Encinitas, CA) on Sep 30, 2012
For my clients with these problems, I use a combination of heat, massage with arnica oils and acupuncture
Johanna Wasen (Blue Ash, OH) on Oct 1, 2012
Range of motion sports massage therapy for shoulders, breaking up any scar tissue present, which may be inhibiting movement. Low back pain can be a symptom of a myriad of issues. Start out with palpative assessment to determine inflammation, tight muscular network, or possible soft tissue damage woyld be appropriate.
Rupa Schodowski (Shelby Township, MI) on Oct 1, 2012
For clients with tight shoulders, do some relaxation massage , stretch shoulder blades , yoga, or pilots and then hip can be loosen by sitting on a big ball or have a gd chair at work and home depending the job of the person. Trigger point is good too!
Jorge Lema (Cape Coral, FL) on Oct 4, 2012
Sports massage which involves stretching the muscles, along with sum trigger point therapy would be get helpful. Als foot reflexology can be performed.
Norma Segovia (San Antonio, TX) on Oct 3, 2012
Myofascial Release is what I would use to release the tightness in the shoulder and back...we need to loosen the fascia first then it inturn release all the tight muscles involved. Range of motion exercises and also some massaging directly to help muscles keep loosening up.
Jesse Freeman (Mansfield, TX) on Oct 4, 2012
I would recommend a 60 minute medical massage which have specific techniques and targeted stretching that are great for the shoulders and lower back.
Anna Waggoner (Indianapolis, IN) on Oct 4, 2012
I would treat a client who is experiencing shoulder pain with plenty of neck, shoulder and back manipulation and stretching. As for the lower back pain, I would do some stretching and kneading of the gluteal muscle group and the hamstrings. Every time I've had a client with lower back pain they are happy with the results of this technique.
MaryAnn Sumaraga (Modesto, CA) on Oct 6, 2012
Acupressure or Therapuetic Massage with some Shiatsu
YJ Word (Roswell, GA) on Oct 6, 2012
For shoulder pain it depends where the pain is,what's causing the pain ,what type of pain. It all relates to the type of therapies.Usually Nueromuscalar therapy does the trick. Lower back depends also because lower back pain from experience does not necessary mean lower back is the issue. Reason why because the pains are usually from what's called refrence areas. You could be feeling it in the lower back yet the cause could be in the hip muscles or internal muscles. Speaking from experience this is Psoas issues. The psoas located underneath the abdominal area. When inflamed can cause what is seem to be lower back pains. Compression of nerve tissue by the psoas is the signal sent to lower back by the brain. This is how you realise there is a problem. Very well you could have a pulled muscle. These type assesments are better done visually. Yj Word
Anthony Lung (San Diego, CA) on Oct 3, 2012
I would be using Tui Na therapy which includes a lot of different types of hand techniques that help to ease the pain, increase range of motion, also relax the muscles.
Ronda McClellan (Concord, NC) on Oct 2, 2012
Hi! For a client with tight shoulders I would massage the shoulders (trapezius), upper and middle back, pectorals or chest muscles with myofascial massage, Swedish and trigger point if needed. I would also use a heating pad on tight areas so that the muscle warms up for deeper work. For the lower back it would depend on where the pain is, I would work the area between the lower ribs and hip, the gluteals and do some stretching. Working on the hip flexors and strengthening the core are also areas that can be worked on to alleviate low back pain. I hope this helps, thank you for your questions.
John Campanelli (Summerfield, FL) on Oct 1, 2012
I specialize in COnnective tissue massage.. so advanced will help you with so many issues including losen your shoulders and releiving lower back pain..
J. Tim Cochran (Hendersonville, NC) on Oct 1, 2012
Everybody...and I mean EVERYBODY has neck, shoulder and low back pain at one time or another. Some have it most of the time. I usually start with Hot Stones, they melt tight muscles like butter. You may have to do some deep tissue work and itd might take several sessions. I tell my clients that "This didn't happen overnight, and I am not going to be able to resolve it in just one hour."
Kei Niebur (College Station, TX) on Oct 1, 2012
While almost everyone could use some shoulder work, especially tight shoulders might benefit from Trigger Point Therapy (TPT). For a particularly problematic set of shoulders, an hour of TPT every 3 days should loosen things up, continuing about 2 weeks or until the problem is resolved. I would also be sure to spend some time on the neck, pectorals, and upper arms so the opposing muscle groups are relaxed as well. For lower back pain, Deep Tissue Massage along the supporting lower back muscles, along with work in the hips and Psoas should help. If you don't have time for continuing sessions, or dislike deep work, then a Hot Stone Massage might help either instead.
Dora Vazquez (Palm Desert, CA) on Oct 1, 2012
Hi pending on your body sensitiviry I would suggest a convination of deep tissue and sports massage I hope you get some body that can work with.
Fred LoPiccolo (Fort Lauderdale, FL) on Oct 2, 2012
I would suggest deep Tissue massage
Jennie Mison (Philadelphia, PA) on Sep 30, 2012
There are a number of different approaches to this depending on what the actual problem is. Tight shoulders and lower back pain are symptoms of another dysfunction so it is impossible to give a realistic or reasonably professional answer to this without seeing you and finding the cause of this problem.