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Massage

Massage therapy can help to decrease pain and muscle aches, reduce stress and anxiety, and promote overall wellness and relaxation.

I have neuropathy in the legs. What's the best type of massage for that?

Vladimir Batista (Miami Beach, FL) on Jan 7, 2013
Massage helps recover feeling and may even reduce some of the pain, but relief (disappear) or cure (remove the damage) can not. It could also help limit further damage occurs. Anyway require treatment under control glucose (sugar) and where possible keep walking, if you stop walking or short walks can be further reduced mobility (by neuropathy but mostly other reasons) in addition to low-impact exercise (walking) will help maintain good glucose levels and avoid other problems that often come with diabetes (cholesterol, heart, etc) Water with shoes, diabetic shoes are recommended to avoid the formation of sores that get complicated, and there are diabetic socks that are seamless and springs are softer to prevent sores and diabetic foot.
Theodore Schiff (Northampton, MA) on Jan 6, 2013
I would highly recommend Shiatsu, Thai Yoga Massage, Integrative Acupressure in addition to Reflexology to you for neuropathy in the legs. Ted Schiff-Valley Massage Therapy, (413)687-7878, tedschiff@valleymassagetherapy.com
Herman Crespo (Miami, FL) on Dec 23, 2012
Swedish massage, featuring tapping, rubbing and hacking movements, is most often used in treating neuropathy. Other popular forms of massage include Trager, which employs a gentle rocking motion, and Rolfing, which utilizes intense, deep-tissue massage Read more: Neuropathy Massage Treatment | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/facts_5679078_neuropathy-massage-treatment.html#ixzz2Fw0O4iJa
John Romano (Oakland Park, FL) on Nov 1, 2012
A combination of MPS Therapy and Swedish
Saderia Cheatham (Mechanicsville, VA) on Oct 29, 2012
A full body massage would be best just make sure your therapist is familiar with neuropathy. Although massage can relax your muscles and reduce pain if your therapist hasnt done research on it they can cause more harm by applying to much pressure. Good luck finding a perfect Massage Therapist
Luis Rivera (Marietta, IL) on Oct 29, 2012
Any type of massage will stimulate blood flow and ease neuropathic symptoms. In reality any type of massage would sooth the issue, but there are specific ones who aim to change the general structure of the muscles and their firing patterns. These would be Shiatsu, Acupressure, Myofacial Release, and PNF stretching techniques.
Mirra Greenway (Columbia, MO) on Oct 28, 2012
A clinical diagnosis of neuropathy means that there is a pathological condition of the nerves-and can mean different degrees of permanent damage to your ability to relay impulses both to the brain and back out to the legs. Your ability to perceive pressure may be impaired, and massage should be of a moderate pressure even though you may implore your therapist to "go deeper" because you cannot feel it. Further damage to surrounding tissues could result, and could offset any therapeutic benefit to be gained. However, the circulatory benefits of massage are well worth you pursuing an appropriate therapist. Lymph Drainage Therapy is a safe, and extremely light approach. Without full neural function, your lymph circulation can be sluggish, especially if you are not as active as you need to be. Light Swedish effleurage, with limb elevation, is a technique any licensed therapist ought to know, and can follow LDT or replace it if you cannot find an LDT therapist. The combination of techniques could be the most beneficial. CranioSacral Therapy and acupuncture are other treatments that may be worth a try.
Stephen Fortier (Pinellas And Pasco Countie, FL) on Oct 27, 2012
Light to medium Swedish techniques should be fine. Most therapists should be able to meet your needs.
Karen Bronson (Bothell, WA) on Oct 24, 2012
Magnet cupping is amazing for this!
James Kennedy (San Diego,ca, CA) on Oct 20, 2012
Light massage like swedish, light touch, Reiki for sure, Healing touch works whne I use it. James
Crystal Wright (Valrico, FL) on Oct 18, 2012
Foot Reflexology along with moderate massage, range of motion and stretching is best for leg neuropathy. I would also use a stimulant essential oil such as mentha, ginger, or peppermint. Sincerely, Crystal Wright, LMT Valrico, FL 888-609-5538
Karen Orlosky (Lafayette, CO) on Oct 14, 2012
Neuropathies have different sources. I would prefer to know more about the reason for your neuropathy before recommending a course of treatment.
Dmitriy Greenberg (Louisville, KY) on Oct 12, 2012
Welcome! I will help you according your condition - today.
Dawn Lamonica (Hyde Park, MA) on Oct 10, 2012
I believe it depends on the cause of your neuropathy. Lymphatic massage may be best to assist with lymph drainage. Provided your circulatory system is not compromised, light massage can assist with circulation, skin tone and muscle tone.
Michael Wolfes (Palm Desert, CA) on Oct 7, 2012
depending on the severity of the condition and the sensitivity of the skin and muscles to touch, I would start with Swedish massage and monitor the amount of pressure with the recipient.
Norma Segovia (San Antonio, TX) on Oct 3, 2012
Lymphatic Drainage is good for neuropathy for swelling that may putting pressure on muscles and nerves. Manual massage is good to since it helps to relax nerves in the limbs and muscles that may apply pressure on your nerves as well. Having regular check ups with your dr is important to make sure you don't develope blood clots.
Anthony Lung (San Diego, CA) on Oct 3, 2012
My suggestion is trigger point therapy or Tui Na therapy. First is to find out exactly what kind of neuropathy it is, so we can use different types of treatment for it. Second, find an acupuncturist who can treat this type of problem.
Kathleen Drebick (Woodbury, NJ) on Oct 2, 2012
Neuropathy is very frustrating and uncomfortable!! ... Massage would be beneficial... As would a Brazilian Toe Technique (no wax involved, lol)... A Brazilian Toe Technique involves holding the Toes of Both Feet in a particular pattern... That combined with an Energy Balance --which involves massage.-- is highly recommended for neuropathy, restless leg syndrome, etal.
Kathleen Drebick (Woodbury, NJ) on Oct 2, 2012
Neuropathy is very frustrating and uncomfortable!! ... Massage would be beneficial... As would a Brazilian Toe Technique (no wax involved, lol)... A Brazilian Toe Technique involves holding the Toes of Both Feet in a particular pattern... That combined with an Energy Balance --which involves massage.-- is highly recommended for neuropathy, restless leg syndrome, etal.
Dora Vazquez (Palm Desert, CA) on Oct 1, 2012
Hi I would suggest swedish massage pending on your sensitivity can be done with light touch.
Dora Vazquez (Palm Desert, CA) on Oct 1, 2012
Hi I would suggest swedish massage pending on your sensitivity can be done with light touch.
Rupa Schodowski (Shelby Township, MI) on Oct 1, 2012
See a foot doctor and understand that it takes time to recover. Reflexology helps , soaking of the feet.
Joe Lavin (Kirkland, WA) on Oct 1, 2012
A neuropathy in the legs, or more specifically, a Peripheral Neuropathy Is a condition which involves the damage, deterioration or destruction of the peripheral nervous system (the nerves outside of our brain). This can be a very serious condition and should be treated as such. Any massage protocols considered should be discussed with your primary doctor. That being said, here are a couple of thoughts about specific and general massage treatments. Specifically I think it is important to determine the cause and classification of the neuropathy before trying to consider possible specific massage therapies for the condition. Do you know the cause of the neuropathy or is it idiopathic? Is there a confirmed diagnosis? Do you trust the diagnoses (neuropathies can be very difficult to diagnose)? Does the diagnosis indicate the possibility of a cure for the condition or a positive treatment for the symptoms and effects of the neuropathy? Can you still discern the amount of pressure being applied in the affected areas so you can warn your massage therapist if the pressure is too great? You should have as many answers as possible to those questions prior to asking a massage therapist for a specific treatment plan for your condition. This goes for almost any specific condition that you are looking for relief from. It is also a good idea to ask your primary care provider if they have any specific massage therapy protocols that they believe would be helpful for your condition as well as any that they would recommend be avoided. This can help get everybody on the “same team”. It is important to note that as a Licensed Massage Practitioner I am not medically qualified or legally allowed to make this type of diagnosis. I also need to be careful to make sure that any protocols I consider for your condition are well thought out and do not impede the healing process or even worse, exacerbate the medical condition. I need to consider any medications that are being taken in association with the diagnosis and treatment plan as well as other possible related or contributing conditions (diabetes, nutrition, changing muscle recruitment patterns, etc.). As a massage therapist trying to relieve the symptoms of a neuropathy it is important that I understand the normal dermatomic or neural pathways and how those might be being affected and changed by the condition. How I can promote healthy circulation within and around the affected dermatomes and ultimately the specifically affected nerves without causing any damage by working too deep. Generally As I understand it, the best type of massage for the most common symptoms reported in cases of actual or suspected peripheral neuropathies (numbness, tingling, burning sensation, pain with movement, etc.) is circulatory massage; massage that promotes blood flow to the affected area as well as to the neural network affecting that area. The massage should be gentle, well thought out and discussed with the patient and the other members of the patient’s health care team. In cases where these symptoms are caused by things such as rehabilitatable injuries, repetitive motion stresses, manageable contributing disease, nutritional deficiencies, postural imbalances, etc. specific relief through the use of massage therapy can be very possible. In other conditions where the nerves are more permanently damaged, massage can be beneficial in treating the symptoms, relaxing the client and/or minimizing the spread of the condition and its effects. Joe Lavin October 1, 2012
Joe Lavin (Seattle, WA) on Oct 1, 2012
A neuropathy in the legs, or more specifically, a Peripheral Neuropathy Is a condition which involves the damage, deterioration or destruction of the peripheral nervous system (the nerves outside of our brain). This can be a very serious condition and should be treated as such. Any massage protocols considered should be discussed with your primary doctor. That being said, here are a couple of thoughts about specific and general massage treatments. Specifically I think it is important to determine the cause and classification of the neuropathy before trying to consider possible specific massage therapies for the condition. Do you know the cause of the neuropathy or is it idiopathic? Is there a confirmed diagnosis? Do you trust the diagnoses (neuropathies can be very difficult to diagnose)? Does the diagnosis indicate the possibility of a cure for the condition or a positive treatment for the symptoms and effects of the neuropathy? Can you still discern the amount of pressure being applied in the affected areas so you can warn your massage therapist if the pressure is too great? You should have as many answers as possible to those questions prior to asking a massage therapist for a specific treatment plan for your condition. This goes for almost any specific condition that you are looking for relief from. It is also a good idea to ask your primary care provider if they have any specific massage therapy protocols that they believe would be helpful for your condition as well as any that they would recommend be avoided. This can help get everybody on the “same team”. It is important to note that as a Licensed Massage Practitioner I am not medically qualified or legally allowed to make this type of diagnosis. I also need to be careful to make sure that any protocols I consider for your condition are well thought out and do not impede the healing process or even worse, exacerbate the medical condition. I need to consider any medications that are being taken in association with the diagnosis and treatment plan as well as other possible related or contributing conditions (diabetes, nutrition, changing muscle recruitment patterns, etc.). As a massage therapist trying to relieve the symptoms of a neuropathy it is important that I understand the normal dermatomic or neural pathways and how those might be being affected and changed by the condition. How I can promote healthy circulation within and around the affected dermatomes and ultimately the specifically affected nerves without causing any damage by working too deep. Generally As I understand it, the best type of massage for the most common symptoms reported in cases of actual or suspected peripheral neuropathies (numbness, tingling, burning sensation, pain with movement, etc.) is circulatory massage; massage that promotes blood flow to the affected area as well as to the neural network affecting that area. The massage should be gentle, well thought out and discussed with the patient and the other members of the patient’s health care team. In cases where these symptoms are caused by things such as rehabilitatable injuries, repetitive motion stresses, manageable contributing disease, nutritional deficiencies, postural imbalances, etc. specific relief through the use of massage therapy can be very possible. In other conditions where the nerves are more permanently damaged, massage can be beneficial in treating the symptoms, relaxing the client and/or minimizing the spread of the condition and its effects. Joe Lavin October 1, 2012
Johanna Wasen (Blue Ash, OH) on Oct 1, 2012
First of all, what is root cause of your neuropathy? Neuromuscular Therapy can be highly beneficial for reintroducing muscle to nerve pathways, that have been damaged.
Dianna Kendrick (Martinez, GA) on Oct 1, 2012
Gentle Swedish massage. Feeling has been compromised so deep tissue or firm pressure is not recommended. Dianna
Tony Adomaitis (Leominster, MA) on Oct 1, 2012
First, was the neuropathy diagnosed by your physician, and to what degree? Depending on the answer, and if there is any edema present, I will decide on either lymphatic work or neural mobilization to start. Both of these are light touch approaches as regular massage is often contraindicated depending on the condition of your circulatory system locally and, globally. You will follow up at home with movement techniques to increase blood flow and I will possibly refer you to an acupuncturist for concurrent treatments.
Canney Yang (New Hyde Park, NY) on Oct 1, 2012
I just massaged one client who has the same problem today. Around 10-15 drops of muscle&joint oil plus massage creme to effleurage, petrissage and trigger point strokes from light pressure to medium one, the results are great. Client smiled and said,"I can walk without pain now." Please come to my office to evaluate first if you'd like to try the this special treatment.
Bonnie Holzman (Miami, FL) on Sep 30, 2012
Exercise is the best to help build muscle strength and help muscle control. Balanced diet,Vitamin B-12. good Luck
Andy Ly (Sterling Heights, MI) on Sep 30, 2012
Hhot stone therapeutic massage, cupping and acupuncture
Martin Schweizer (Encinitas, CA) on Sep 30, 2012
I would recommend gentle, soothng circulatory massage to calm the nerves
Trina Elson (Stuart, FL) on Sep 30, 2012
For individuals who have diabetes, the best massage is a good Swedish massage. This type massage helps with poor circulation which is a huge problem in diabetic clients and often leads to numbness in hands, feet and legs. The main thing is to increase your circulation to your feet and legs. This helps with neuropathy.
Jennie Mison (Philadelphia, PA) on Sep 30, 2012
Neuropathy is a painful condition where the nerves - not the muscles and fascia - are irritated and firing signals repeatedly or not firing signals (usually pain signals) at all. Massage cannot affect nerve impulses directly. At best, it can relax muscles/fascia that might be indirectly or directly irritating nerves that are causing pain (e.g. Piriformis Syndrome). Massage might make you feel better but there is no way to guarantee that it will change the quality of your neuropathy pain.
Nobledamon Withey-Bey (Atlanta, GA) on Sep 30, 2012
neuropathy is a neuropathy is a nerve damage and depending on the cause of the damage will need doctor advise how ever if it is due to diabetes i suggest B complex. massage can help create some normal feeling while being massages and will return to the discomfort after the massage. Also ucan soak in deadsea salt to get mineral absorbtion to assist in the process
Mario Messina-Azekri (Portland, OR) on Sep 30, 2012
Neuropathy in your legs could be an indication of diabetes. The massage has to be done lightly since you have very little feeling in the legs. Raising your legs up every night for 15 minutes may help reduce the pain and swelling.
Bharat Kalra (Wheaton, IL) on Sep 29, 2012
Massage with long strokes applied with medium pressure. Low back area surrounding sacrum should be worked upon.
Roy Kenji Omori (Newport, RI) on Sep 29, 2012
It would be best to know from a doctor what is causing the neuropathy before doing any kind of massage. If it caused from swelling from fluids, probably a light massage and maybe lymphatic drainage type of massage if it is caused by tight muscles deep tissue might be an option
Fabian Soto (, ) on Sep 29, 2012
just find the spot that is stoping the energy to flow and the feeling of disconfort and trembling they call them triguer points
K.C. Schellhammer (, ) on Sep 29, 2012
Reflexology, it will help move the blood around and the lymph.
Paula Reeder (Katy, TX) on Sep 29, 2012
I find that firm massage as well as Reflexology will address these problems well
Surjani Tarjoto (Beaverton, OR) on Sep 29, 2012
Swedish massage is most often used in treating neuropathy, or gentle rocking motion.
Erica Johnson (Philadelphia, PA) on Sep 28, 2012
Hello, A Swedish massage would be a great option because it will help increase circulation. I hope this helps:)
Liz Yerkes (Longboat Key, FL) on Sep 28, 2012
Since the feeling in your legs is compromised, look for a therapist who will work lightly. Your feedback about pressure will not be as accurate as you might assume.
Geraldine Macinski (Sandy Hook, CT) on Sep 28, 2012
Neuropathy is beyond the scope of massage.
Geraldine Macinski (Monroe, CT) on Sep 28, 2012
Neuropathy is beyond the scope of massage.
Bette Harvey (Plant City, FL) on Sep 28, 2012
It depends on if this is a complication of a particular disease as to the course of action. If Raynaud disease, MS, diabetes or development following a surgical procedure, any hypersensitive areas should be avoided. And because of the reduced sensation, you may be unable to give accurate feedback about pressure so pressure must be reduced over the affected areas. When applying stretching or joint mobilizations, caution must be used. Best type of massage is Swedish. (Reference "Massage Therapy Principles and Practice" by Susan Salvo.)
Hubert Holtzclaw (Dorchester Center, MA) on Sep 28, 2012
hello. First , what has caused your neuropathy? Are you diabetic, was it trauma to your body(injury), nerve damage ? Pressure on your nerves definitely has to be relieved. Are you taking any medication for this ? What has your physician recommended ? Please contact me with further information for a proper recommendation.
Tony Ruggiero (Greenville, SC) on Sep 28, 2012
I guess my first question is where is the Neuropathy? Where does it originate? The diagnosis of the underlying problem depends on the answer to those questions. If, for example, the pain is radiating down from the hip/gluteal area it could be a sciatic nerve issue. I would be treating the Gluteal area for the possibility of Piriformis Syndrome which can cause generalized Neuropathy in the upper leg and radiating in some cases to the calf. The nerve involvement can also be occurring higher somewhere in the base of the spine. Location, and type of Neuropathy is important to know in cases like this.
Carol Hayes (West Dundee, IL) on Sep 28, 2012
The best massage for neuropathy is using a variety of strokes such as long, firm strokes and circular motion strokes. This is done while changing the position of the leg from time to time.
Mark Lohmann (Fort Lauderdale, FL) on Sep 28, 2012
In my opinion, almost ANY massage should help. We have "Medi-Rub" foot massagers at our office, and have found lot's of clients with neuropathy have had amazing results.
Nina Edley (Laurel, MD) on Sep 28, 2012
I would suggest a light Swedish using techniques such as friction, circular motion and light compressions/holds.
Jeff Hysong (Glendale, AZ) on Sep 28, 2012
A mix of Russian sport and Swedish (deep tissue) is the best treatment
David Martin (Matthews, NC) on Sep 28, 2012
Neuropathy is generally caused by pressure on the nerves in the L4/L5 area. Because it involves the lower back, I'm using myofascial release again. Just two days ago a client came to me with neuropathy. I was able to help to the extent that the next day I received a call from her friend who also wanted to book an appointment.
Jill Garner (Mahomet, IL) on Sep 28, 2012
A light but invigorating massage can help promote circulation and blood flow to damaged nerves helping to alleviate painful symptoms.
Katherine Turner (Schertz, TX) on Sep 28, 2012
regular swedish would be best for you. it helps with the circulation of blood flow throughout the body. a lot of diabetics get this to help with that too
Kennette Klees (Houston, TX) on Sep 28, 2012
Swedish Massage, Reiki, and CranioSacral