Book health & wellness appointments instantly
 

Dental crowns

Dental crowns are permanent tooth covers that are cemented to chipped, cracked or broken teeth to improve their appearance and function.

After a new crown, my adjacent teeth are contacting more and are a little sore. Should I let the dentist grind other healthy teeth to try and fix the bite?

Elisa Mello (New York, NY) on Oct 25, 2011
A new crown should fit properly. If there is too much contact on the new crown on biting, your dentist should not grind the adjunct or opposing teeth in order to make it fit. Only the crown should be adjusted in order to create a proper fit, and then only slightly. If too much of the crown needs to be adjusted in order to create a proper fit, that is a sure sign that the crown should be re-made. Too many attempts to make the crown work is never a good idea.
Ramin Tabib (New York, NY) on Oct 25, 2011
A new crown should fit properly. If there is too much contact on the new crown on biting, your dentist should not grind the adjunct or opposing teeth in order to make it fit. Only the crown should be adjusted in order to create a proper fit and only slightly. If too much of the crown needs to be adjusted in order to create a proper fit that is a sure sign that the crown should be re-made. Small adjustments are always necessary. Too many attempts to make the crown work is never a good idea
Steven Bader (Newton Centre, MA) on Oct 25, 2011
From your description it is possible the new crown is a bit short. It would be unusual for it to be so short that you notice pain in the adjacent teeth but it is certainly possible. I would hesitate to allow grinding on the adjacent teeth because all your teeth fit like a puzzle. If you change additional pieces you may find that it ruins the alignment of other teeth. If it can be confirmed that the new crown is short and that is the cause of your discomfort I would prefer to have the new crown remade to a proper bite. The dentist may not like to hear that but it may be the best treatment. Regarding the cement, that should be able to be polished smooth in your mouth. I hope that helps. Good luck!
Amanda Seay (Mount Pleasant, SC) on Oct 25, 2011
I would allow a few days to see if your bite settles before you return for more adjustments. Do not wait longer than a few days though. A correct bite should be just that- CORRECT! However, sometimes there is some inflammation during procedures and I would allow up to 48 hours for the bite to feel natural and normal. If your bite is still slightly off then your dentist can gently polish the adjacent teeth to correct the bite. If you new crown is contacting much more than a slight polishing can correct then you may need to reconsider having a new crown made instead of aggressively recontouring the adjacent teeth.
Kamini Talati (Port Saint Lucie, FL) on Oct 25, 2011
If the teeth continue to be sore after a week, you should contact your dentist and allow him or her to make adjustments. The crown can be polished at any time after it has been placed.
Christopher Baer (Aurora, CO) on Oct 25, 2011
The bite may settle in, but a properly done crown should contact with the same amount of pressure(force) as the teeth on either side. I would be hesitant about allowing the dentist to grind healthy teeth to try and fix this. As to the cement remaining on the crown, this should be removed completely and polished smooth after it has been cemented in your mouth.
Debra Glassman (New York, NY) on Oct 25, 2011
Yes. Your dentist has an arsenal of polishing instruments to make it really smooth and shiny.
Les Latner (Los Angeles, CA) on Oct 25, 2011
The adjacent teeth that you refer to are in front or behind the new crown? If yes, then generally this soreness will be gone in a day or so and nothing will need to be ground. If the soreness doesn't go away, you should consult with your dentist about the soreness. If it is the tooth above or below that is sore, you should return to your dentist for a possible adjustment. Usually, the crown would need to be ground, not the opposing tooth. And yes, the porcelain on a crown can be polished smooth in the mouth.
Michael Apa (New York, NY) on Dec 2, 2011
its usually due to a contact being too tight. your dentist should be able to adjust the contact of the crown before permanently cementing it.
Brook Derenzy (Redmond, OR) on Nov 4, 2011
If your teeth are tight when flossing, a simple Contact-EZ diamond strip can be flossed between your teeth by your dentist to lighten the contact. If your new crown is sore to bite on, then definitely have your crown smoothed down slightly by your dentist until you have even contacts with your other teeth. Teeth can get "bruised" by a high spot and can lead to significant discomfort. If you have a sharp point (a plunger cusp) on an opposing tooth, it is usually okay to round or soften this point to prevent fracture of your crown. Oftentimes, the reason that your tooth needs a new crown in the first place is because of this sharp cusp on the opposing tooth driving into the tooth and causing it to fracture. Remove the cause and your new crown can withstand the extreme forces that your bite puts on it everyday. Rough cement is a common problem with our tooth-colored resin cements, as they often have a "chameleon effect" with porcelain crowns and tooth structure. It is usually a simply process for your dentist to remove this from the crown and have it smoothed and polished.