Massage News

Media Center

I'm Finally Convinced That Inflammation Is At The Root Of My Anxiety. Here's What I'm Doing About It

Mind Body Green

I'm Finally Convinced That Inflammation Is At The Root Of My Anxiety. Here's What I'm Doing About It

Speaking of treating myself a little nicer—I've started getting semi-regular massages. Massages have been found in numerous studies to decrease inflammation and reduce anxiety. I like to do in-home massages because, for me, all of the effects of a massage are diminished when I re-emerge onto New York's cacophonous streets, dodging bikers and pressing up against strangers on a crowded subway. There are tons of apps now that let you order same-day, reasonably priced massages to your home—I've been using Zeel, and I've been so impressed with the quality of the therapists and the ease of use—plus, being able to go straight from the massage table to bed really helps the effects linger. It's definitely one of the more expensive types of therapies I've practiced, but, when I get massages regularly (versus just a special-occasion splurge), I feel a noticeable difference in my baseline anxiety levels. My muscles are also looser, which helps mitigate the cycle of misattribution that can come from physical symptoms of anxiety (meaning: You feel things that often result from anxiety, like tight muscles or nausea, and your subconscious decides you must be anxious, making you feel anxious and thus tighten your muscles or become nauseous, and the cycle continues...)