Massage News

Media Center

2016 Wellness Trends

Well + Good

2016 Wellness Trends

No. 4: The Uber-ization of Beauty and Spa Services. The spa and beauty world has embraced the tech-enabled sharing economy with on-demand services. Zeel can get a massage therapist to your door in less time than it takes for your takeout order to arrive. The Ritualist does the same with pore-perfecting facialists. Manicube sends manicurists to the office of busy professionals. And Glamsquad deploys hair stylists and makeup artists across NYC, LA, and Miami (with Chicago, Dallas, and Washington, DC slated for 2016). Even a spray tan is just a click away these days. Their popularity stems from the simple fact that women are just really crazy busy. “During our home appointments, our clients are sending emails, talking to their children, reading the newspaper, or browsing on social media,” says Alexandra Wilkes Wilson, Glamsquad’s co-founder and CEO. “Now you don’t need to spend an hour or more at the salon and put your life on hold to look and feel your best.” And if the service isn’t in-home or office, it’s more convenient than ever: Manhattan’s Heyday forgos languid spa rituals in favor of affordable, drop-in facials; desert-chic The Now in Los Angeles offers massages in 30 minute increments, so you don’t have to clear your schedule to enjoy a moment of relaxation; and Mud, currently in Chicago and Boulder, offers skin-care masks like DryBar offers blow-outs, in a shared room. In the process, they’re democratizing the notion of pampering. “People don’t have time, they don’t have money, and it’s pretty inconvenient to schedule [traditional spa] appointments on a regular basis.” says Heyday’s co-founder and CEO Adam Ross. He speaks for the whole beauty movement when saying, “we’re not re-imagining the facial, we’re re-imagining the experience of the facial.” That and making beauty and wellness services possible for otherwise busy, stressed-out people.