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I'm a runner and am experiencing an extreme tightness in my Achilles tendon whether I'm jogging or not.

Wayne Smith (Lebanon, PA) on Feb 15, 2012
You may have a minor rupture within in the tendon fibers, caused by the wearing of incorrect footwear or outworn footwear. Once the pain as gone I would first see a footwear specialist and have them watch you run on a treadmill. They will be able to advise you on choosing the right running shoe for your running gait. Second, look at your running route. For example, if you run on the same side of the road every time, this could cause trouble for the lower limbs due to the camber of the road side. Try running on opposite sides of the road, or even going cross-country. Change the terrain not only will give something more eye pleasing to look at but will be softer on the impact which will save your joints. To reduce the pain you could try the tried and true RICE procedure. Finally, see a doctor.
Ralph Arellanes (Albuquerque, NM) on Feb 15, 2012
It is likely because your muscles are experiencing overuse and tightness. The problem doesn't indicate an issue with your Achilles tendon, but rather tightness in the muscles attached and near the tendon. Tight gastrocnemius and soleus muscles of the calf, as well as tightness in the hamstrings, arewhat is causing the tightness and discomfort in that area 9 times out of 10. Focus on flexibility of those areas with some self-myofascial release followed by some isolated static stretches. Then move on to active/dynamic flexibility (lunges, body weight squats, and other in-motion techniques).
John Hoadley (Middletown, CT) on Feb 15, 2012
First off, see a specialist and either get therapy or corrective exercise training with a certified functional trainer. A functional trainer can help you find the injury and prevent further injury. Meanwhile, you can do a few things. Stop running for a bit. Use a heating and cooling ointment, like Tiger Balm or Icy Hot. Ice the area, keeping it elevated from time to time if it swells. Once you decide to get back into running, take it slow. Reduce distance and get in a good warm up and cool down. Stretch before and after every run. You might even want to get a running coach.
John Hoadley (Cromwell, CT) on Feb 15, 2012
First off, see a specialist and either get therapy or corrective exercise training with a certified functional trainer. A functional trainer can help you find the injury and prevent further injury. Meanwhile, you can do a few things. Stop running for a bit. Use a heating and cooling ointment, like Tiger Balm or Icy Hot. Ice the area, keeping it elevated from time to time if it swells. Once you decide to get back into running, take it slow. Reduce distance and get in a good warm up and cool down. Stretch before and after every run. You might even want to get a running coach.
Franklin Antoian (Delray Beach, FL) on Feb 15, 2012
With any injury or pain, the first step is R.I.C.E. Rest. Take a break from running for at least 72 hours and up to 2 weeks. Ice. Apply ice wrapped in a towel for 15 minutes every 2 hours Compression. An Ace bandage can help minimize the swelling. Elevate your injured leg. This will help limit blood flow and prevent use of the muscles. Lastly, if your injury does not heal within 2 weeks, see an appropriate professional for an accurate diagnosis.
Michael Rosengart (Los Angeles, CA) on Feb 15, 2012
I've ruptured my Achilles twice so I feel your pain. Your Achilles is compensating for some imbalances in your gait (stride). There are several gait stretches that will help that you should employ before your run, if not every day, to get your body mechanics back to their natural movement patterns. But before you even start on these stretches, take time to hydrate adequately and do some soft tissue work, like foam rolling and self massage, to help with your mobility. On top of that, cross train in the gym to help your strength and flexibility.
William Turner (New York, NY) on Feb 15, 2012
A tight Achilles tendon could very well be an indication of a tight hamstring, which in turn effects the calf muscle and eventually other parts along the posterior kinetic chain. Another factor may be the types of sneakers you are wearing. If you are flat footed or the sneaker is too narrow, this will cause the foot to internally rotate, putting pressure on the Achilles tendon. Wearing the proper running shoe is critical for runners. If the tightness persists, chances are it will only get worse, Invest more time in stretching the hamstrings and calf muscles on a consistent basis. Here are some exercises you can do. 1. Hurdle Stretches While kneeling on a mat on one knee, step the opposing foot away from the midline of your body, heel side up. Push the leading foot forward without allowing the knee to extend beyond the toe. Do not force the range of motion. You should feel a comfortable stretch on the back of the leading leg, and in some cases the front of the kneeling leg on the quadriceps if they are tight. This particular stretch serves the dual function of stretching both the quadricep of one leg and the hamstring of the other leg. Repeat this movement 15 to 25 times. 2. Active Straight Leg Lie on your back with legs straight. Lift one leg at a time. Try to keep the foot of the resting leg internally rotated or turned in towards the midline of your body. Delicately place both hands behind the extended leg and draw it upward towards your chest, while attempting to keep the leg as straight as possible without forcing the range of motion. You will notice that one side may be tighter than the other. Repeat this movement 15 to 25 times. 3. Hell Presses Lay flat on your back, with both knees drawn inward, slightly parallel to the chest. Extend both legs towards the ceiling at the same time, as if you were pressing the ceiling with your heels. Keep the feet flexed or pointed inward towards you at all times. Do not force the range of motion. Repeat this movement 15 to 25 times. Three to four sets of each exercise is ideal.
James Weaver (Milford, CT) on Feb 15, 2012
You have one of the symptoms of severe Achilles tendon problems. Usually when this happens, you have been doing some type of sport or activity that overuses the calf muscle. This can cause microtears in the tendons over a period of time. Failing to stretch properly before and after exercising and wearing shoes with poor arch support and rigid heels can cause this problem. Tearing in the Achilles tendon can take weeks or months to heal. In some cases it may never heal. The reason you might be feeling the tightness when you are not running is that the microtears are not healed. I would check with your doctor to rule out a rupture in your Achilles tendon.Other symptoms of a tear or rupture include pain or discomfort, swelling, weakness, inability to bend the foot down, stiffness or decreased movement(which you have), a lump or bulge, and joint pain. Mild cases can be healed by rest, over the counter pain medicine and stretching exercises. Severe problems can be treated by surgery or a cast, splint, brace, walking boot or some other device that keeps the lower leg from moving.
Ashley Pettit (Chicago, IL) on Feb 15, 2012
Achilles pain is no fun. As a trainer and avid distance runner, I often get tightness in my Achilles when training that persists post-run as well. Get a prescription to see a physical therapist so that you can learn stretches to help you heal. Depending on your level of pain and tightness, they could tell you to stop running for up to two weeks. However, with stretching, massages, and icing, I was able to continue training for the marathon this year and did not have to stop running. For now, try rubbing a tennis ball in circles up your calves and stretching the calf muscles as often as you can.
Derek Duke Noble (New York, NY) on Feb 15, 2012
Your extremely tight Achilles tendon could be caused from improper footwear or a poor running gait. To prevent pain, I recommend doing a sports ice massage with a frozen paper cup for 10 minutes on and 10 minutes off after your long runs. Try incorporating more trail or track running into your weekly running program. If the tightness persists, you may want to try some sports massage or deep tissue therapy on the area. In good health, Duke
Christina Tyler (Indian Trail, NC) on Feb 15, 2012
There are several ways to aggravate the Achilles tendon. A few ways are an untreated or undiagnosed injury, side effects from a medication, improper footwear, misalignment or even overuse. Often, stretching can help with discomfort or pain. However, I wouldn't do any running until you've had a doctor examine the issue.
Bryna Carracino (Los Angeles, CA) on Mar 26, 2012
are you stretching properly before you run? after? foam roll? do you ice? take advil? what are you doing for weight training? what kind of shoes do you wear in normal day? what type of sneakers do you wear when running? what type of terrain do you run on? i would love to help you so please get in touch! Best Bryna Itrainwithbryna.com