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How can I reduce the bursa at the side of my foot/base of my big toe?

Franklin Antoian (Delray Beach, FL) on Sep 28, 2012
1 user found this answer helpful
You will need to see a doctor or physical therapist regarding bursa at the side of my foot/base of my big toe.
Bette Eastman (Plant City, FL) on Sep 28, 2012
You're describing bursitis or inflammation of the bursae, which are located between ligaments & joint capsules to provide cushioning that protect a muscle's tendon from rubbing against bone during muscular contraction. There are two types of bursitis: acute and chronic (most common). Acute has a sudden onset and chronic results from longstanding bursitis and may be caused from overuse, prolonged repetitive motion, and excessive pressure. If yours is chronic, and you are able, avoid overuse, any repetitive motions and be sure you are wearing proper foot wear. If acute, local massage cannot be done until the inflammation has subsided but you can use ice packs over the affected area while massaging the unaffected areas. If chronic, gently massage the area in addition to the aforementioned suggestions to relieve the actions causing it.
Bette Eastman (Plant City, FL) on Sep 28, 2012
You're describing bursitis or inflammation of the bursae, which are located between ligaments & joint capsules to provide cushioning that protect a muscle's tendon from rubbing against bone during muscular contraction. There are two types of bursitis: acute and chronic (most common). Acute has a sudden onset and chronic results from longstanding bursitis and may be caused from overuse, prolonged repetitive motion, and excessive pressure. If yours is chronic, and you are able, avoid overuse, any repetitive motions and be sure you are wearing proper foot wear. If acute, local massage cannot be done until the inflammation has subsided but you can use ice packs over the affected area while massaging the unaffected areas. If chronic, gently massage the area in addition to the aforementioned suggestions to relieve the actions causing it.
Dan Kritsonis (Bellevue, WA) on Sep 28, 2012
Put ice on the area several times per day this will reduce swelling.Once the area is no longer warm the touch or swollen place some heat on the area for 10 to 15 minutes a few times a day.Avoid placing pressure on the area like standing for long periods of time. This puts pressure on the are which will prevent healing.Take a anti inflammatory meidication to help relieve the pain and reduce swelling.
Surjani Tarjoto (Beaverton, OR) on Sep 29, 2012
When the condition of the Gout is not flaring. One of the natural methods is through reflexology and foot massage.
Bharat Kalra (Wheaton, IL) on Sep 29, 2012
Cold Lasers if the burs is inflamed. Also we will have to work on your gait. Because bursas are cushions provided by the body where ever extra ordinary pressure is exerted. If you can get rid of this pressure by correcting your posture you may not have that bursa forming at all.
Fabian Soto (Hollywood, FL) on Sep 29, 2012
just press on it .is cause by the lactic acid under.
Kate Reust (Seattle, WA) on Sep 29, 2012
hi there, The issue may be to determine if it's bursitis / abnormal bone growth or if it's soft tissue. I've heard of Young Living Pine oil or Spruce having a great effect on bone spurs. But getting a good podiatrist on your team is where I'd start. I've personally had a bursa surgically shaved down - and a bursa re-assignment. If the main problem is site pain from shoes rubbing - then taking down the excess bone formation may be sufficient to really impact how it feels.
Carol Stuhmer (Miami, FL) on Sep 28, 2012
Have you seen a podiatrist?
Peggy Richards (Scottsdale, AZ) on Sep 28, 2012
I don't think there is a way to reduce the bursa with out surgical removing the bone. YOU CAN HOWEVER change your foot and that would effect your toe to some degree - lengthening out and giving you more foot to stand on. The change would come over time through having change in your use of weight and walk.
Katherine Turner (Schertz, TX) on Sep 28, 2012
it sounds like that would need a professional dr.s opinion. a massage therapist cannot diagnose any medical condition.
Tracy Bloom (Fairfield, CT) on Sep 28, 2012
Inflamed bursa is bursitis. Gentle manipulation and exercise may help, but I would see a foot doc.
Sarah Murray (Wilmington, DE) on Sep 28, 2012
I would first like to know what the origin of this is - does it happen to be gout? If so, dietary changes are in order. Even if it isn't, I would take a look at diet to make sure nothing is causing this inflammation. Drinking more water is probably necessary. How much is your daily water intake? Light massage is in order, although I wouldn't do anything too drastic, as there are certainly plenty of toxins built up in this area, and there needs to be a detox plan in place. Let me know if I can be of any assistance to you. Good luck! Sarah
Gregory Doyle (New York, NY) on Sep 28, 2012
If your big toe points towards your other toes, this may be a bunion, not a bursa. You should see a podiatrist, these can sometimes be treated non-surgically, or be removed with a small procedure.
Carol Hayes (West Dundee, IL) on Sep 28, 2012
Massage on the foot and especially toe area can help relax the joint and promote tissue repair. Ultrasound is also very effective.
Micah Mays (Norman, OK) on Sep 28, 2012
Bursas tend to develop due to friction on the base of your big toe. You might want to take a closer look at your shoes to see if they are causing a lot of pressure on your bursa. My mother has that problem and she has had to change her shoes to help alleviate the pressure.
Mario Messina-Azekri (Portland, OR) on Sep 30, 2012
Bowenwork w=has techniques for busa swelling as well as techniques for foot and ankle. Bursitis can be helped with icing as well as taking lecithin granules with your meals.
Jennie Mison (Philadelphia, PA) on Sep 30, 2012
You cannot reduce the bursa anywhere with massage because if it is actually bursa that is swollen, it is a result of inflammation and irritation and is usually managed with rest, ice, and anti-inflammatory meds. If you cannot find the cause of the irritation/inflammation, see a podiatrist.
Karen Bronson (Bothell, WA) on Oct 24, 2012
That is a tough one, because usually it is encapsulated which would make it difficult to relieve the fluid trapped. It may be worth trying cupping by a certified massage therapist after soaking your foot in very warm water.
James Kennedy (, ) on Oct 20, 2012
Light massage works, lymphatic drainage, accupresssure, also acupunture. James
Breanna Gieseker (Santa Rosa, CA) on Oct 11, 2012
A bursa is a fluid filled sac that reduces friction and protects structures surrounding joints surfaces. If it is inflamed this is considered a local contraindication for massage, in other words it should not be worked on directly with a significant amount of pressure. I would suggest seeing a massage therapist who takes posture and range of motion into account when planning a clients session. I have also seen amazing results with inflammation and swelling when Manual Lymphatic Drainage techniques are used.
Luis Rivera (Marietta, IL) on Oct 28, 2012
Best bet is to talk to a pediatrist or orthopedist of the lower extremity. They would have techniques to do with tissues such as bursa. Thank you.
Saderia Cheatham (Mechanicsville, VA) on Oct 29, 2012
It really depends on how bad it is. I would need to examine it first.
Carin Piacente (Putnam Valley, NY) on Nov 4, 2012
Are your sure that this is a bursa and not a bunion? Dr. P
John Romano (Oakland Park, FL) on Nov 1, 2012
You would never want to reduce the bursa in any joint, the bursa provides synovial fluid which lubricates the joint and makes it easy to move
YJ Word (Roswell, GA) on Oct 6, 2012
Stripping the along the side of the foot towards the base of the toe should reduce the pain in the inflamed area.
YJ Word (Roswell, GA) on Oct 6, 2012
Stripping the along the side of the foot towards the base of the toe should reduce the pain in the inflamed area.
Andy Ly (Sterling Heights, MI) on Sep 30, 2012
Micro-puncture techniques on the foot base with (minimal pain) to relief the toxin or blood stagnation which allow toxin to be removed and allow new blood with oxygen, nutrients and biochemical to take place and to repair the damaged tissue naturally
Trina Elson (Stuart, FL) on Sep 30, 2012
At the on set of bursa, you will want to apply ice to reduce the swelling and inflammation. Then we can apply deep-heat therapy or ultrasound to increase blood flow to the affected joint and promote tissue repair. We recommend massage therapy to stimulate circulation and relax the surrounding muscles.
Alicia Bunting (Phoenix, AZ) on Sep 30, 2012
Massage is contraindicated in the acute phase of bursa. Massaging surrounding muscles is highly beneficial. When you have foot pain you force the body to move differently, which can cause full body aches. Massage will help release tight surrounding muscles. I also do energy work that is indicated at any stage.
Canney Yang (New Hyde Park, NY) on Oct 1, 2012
I am not sure how serious of your bursa. But if you feel very painful, then try to put some ice pack to the affected area around 10-15 min, then self massage the around area, you may put few drops of muscle&joint oil along with massage lotion, that might help. But it's better to make an appointment to come to my office to check it first.
Jesse Freeman (Mansfield, TX) on Oct 4, 2012
30 minute reflexology treatment followed by soaking feet in Epsom salts for 15 minutes
John Musco (Ithaca, NY) on Oct 1, 2012
Bursa are fluid-filled sacs that cushion areas of friction between tendon and bone. A common cause in this area are shoes that do not fit well. Another cause could be from an old injury. Applications of ice will reduce the swelling. Resting the area will help the swelling and pain reside. If the Bursa is chronic sometimes it may need to be drained. I have not had much experience with bursa issues, but I checked with Dr Weil and his website and he suggests as a natural remedy apply DMSO to the affected area. He also suggests powered Ginger as it has anti inflammatory agents. His website is www.drweil.com/
Richard Bartlett (Lansing, MI) on Dec 11, 2012
If you feel a hard lump, you may have a bunion, which is on the bone rather than in the bursae. Read about bunions on the Mayo Clinic or some other medical site and see if this might be what you have. Massage can relax the muscles crossing the big toe joint, but it may not have much effect on the bone itself. Bursae can be very tender when sore. Massage may simply aggravate this. Ice and NSAIDs may be your best bet for reducing inflammation, if bursitis is what you have.